New exhibition touts “hot” Arizona

For Immediate Release
Mary E. Fowler 

New exhibition touts “hot” Arizona

CONTACT: Michelle Dock
TELEPHONE: 480-350-2867
E-MAIL: michelle_dock@tempe.gov

TEMPE, Ariz. – “Some Like it Hot,” an exhibition exploring the desert lifestyle, paying special attention to a precious resource in the desert…water…will be on display from April 20-Aug. 15 in the Youth Library Gallery, 3500 S. Rural Road.

Phoenix artists John Armstrong, Wendy Willis and Kathryn Maxwell highlight the people who live, work and play in Arizona and address the questions: Where did they come from? Why do they live here?

About the Artists
Armstrong was born and raised in Laurel, Mont. He has been a museum director/curator, teacher and a collaborator with artists in his printmaking studio. He emulates the teaching ideals of Ben Steele while working independently in sculpture, painting, and printmaking. Armstrong is co-founder of Armstrong-Prior, Inc., a multi-faceted arts business encompassing fine arts printing, publishing and arts brokering. He also has worked placed in private, corporate and international collections. Armstrong now devotes his time to creating his own work in sculpture, painting and collaboration with artists in his printmaking studio.

Willis earned a Bachelor of Science degree in design from the University of Cincinnati and continued her artistic education through painting and printmaking workshops throughout the Southwest. Her art has been included in a wide selection of solo, group and juried exhibitions, art publications and public art commissions. Willis is also a participating member of the Arizona Print Group and the 515Arts Gallery in Phoenix.

Maxwell is originally a Midwesterner and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., and a Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Wisconsin. Maxwell’s prints and mixed media works have been exhibited in more than 20 solo exhibitions and more than 30 group exhibitions in places such as Scotland, India, Belgium and the United States. Since 1988, Maxwell has been a professor of printmaking at Arizona State University and, more recently, acquired the Associate Director for Academic Affairs position.

LIBRARY HOURS
10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday
10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Tuesday-Thursday
10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday-Saturday
Noon to 5 p.m., Sunday
(Closed on city-observed holidays)

INFORMATION
www.tempe.gov/arts/Exhibitions/library.htm
Telephone: 480-350-2867

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To find out more about the programs, services and amenities that makes our city great please visit:
http://www.tempe.gov/newsroom/

New exhibition touts “hot” Arizona

For Immediate Release
Mary E. Fowler 

New exhibition touts “hot” Arizona

CONTACT: Michelle Dock
TELEPHONE: 480-350-2867
E-MAIL: michelle_dock@tempe.gov

TEMPE, Ariz. – “Some Like it Hot,” an exhibition exploring the desert lifestyle, paying special attention to a precious resource in the desert…water…will be on display from April 20-Aug. 15 in the Youth Library Gallery, 3500 S. Rural Road.

Phoenix artists John Armstrong, Wendy Willis and Kathryn Maxwell highlight the people who live, work and play in Arizona and address the questions: Where did they come from? Why do they live here?

About the Artists
Armstrong was born and raised in Laurel, Mont. He has been a museum director/curator, teacher and a collaborator with artists in his printmaking studio. He emulates the teaching ideals of Ben Steele while working independently in sculpture, painting, and printmaking. Armstrong is co-founder of Armstrong-Prior, Inc., a multi-faceted arts business encompassing fine arts printing, publishing and arts brokering. He also has worked placed in private, corporate and international collections. Armstrong now devotes his time to creating his own work in sculpture, painting and collaboration with artists in his printmaking studio.

Willis earned a Bachelor of Science degree in design from the University of Cincinnati and continued her artistic education through painting and printmaking workshops throughout the Southwest. Her art has been included in a wide selection of solo, group and juried exhibitions, art publications and public art commissions. Willis is also a participating member of the Arizona Print Group and the 515Arts Gallery in Phoenix.

Maxwell is originally a Midwesterner and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., and a Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Wisconsin. Maxwell’s prints and mixed media works have been exhibited in more than 20 solo exhibitions and more than 30 group exhibitions in places such as Scotland, India, Belgium and the United States. Since 1988, Maxwell has been a professor of printmaking at Arizona State University and, more recently, acquired the Associate Director for Academic Affairs position.

LIBRARY HOURS
10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday
10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Tuesday-Thursday
10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday-Saturday
Noon to 5 p.m., Sunday
(Closed on city-observed holidays)

INFORMATION
www.tempe.gov/arts/Exhibitions/library.htm
Telephone: 480-350-2867

– 30 –
 

Image

To find out more about the programs, services and amenities that makes our city great please visit:
http://www.tempe.gov/newsroom/

Can the arts save struggling cities?

Something is stirring in Detroit. Here, in a city that in the past decade alone lost a quarter of its already dwindling population, plans are in the works to revive the manufacturing economy — at least on a small scale. The Detroit FAB Lab taps into the vibe of “maker” labs and hackerspaces around the globe. Its creators envision an incubator for artists, artisans, and entrepreneurs. Members will have access to equipment for woodworking, metalworking, digital fabrication, and media, as well as business coaching and networking.

“Detroit has always been a place where things have been made,” says Alex Feldman, one of the project’s creators, who works on economic development strategies with the company U3 Ventures. “That tradition is still alive here. But it’s starting to shift in a small way to a more [artistic] culture of manufacturing and creation.”

The FAB Lab, a part of Wayne State University’s TechTown initiative, recently won a planning grant from ArtPlace America, a collaboration of charitable foundations, the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), and federal agencies. The funding is designed not just to feed starving artists or prop up grand old arts institutions. Under the banner of “creative placemaking,” these grants aim to inject new life into local economies.
“Our idea is that we will invest in art and culture as part of a portfolio of strategies meant to transform communities,” says ArtPlace president Carol Coletta.

In September, ArtPlace announced $11.5 million in grants for the Detroit FAB Lab and 33 other projects designed to “integrate artists and arts organizations into key local efforts in transportation, housing, community development, job creation and more.” Two months prior, the NEA doled out $6.5 million in the first round of Our Town grants, funding 51 public-private partnerships that are also trying to both buoy up the arts and reshape communities.

But if the goal is to strengthen local economies, are these people wise to throw their money at artists? Wouldn’t foundations and government agencies be better off putting their money toward industries that create real jobs?

Luis Ubiñas, president of the Ford Foundation, which is a partner in ArtPlace, summed up the philosophy of creative placemaking on the NEA’s Art Works blog: